Health Savings Accounts (HSAs)

Source: IRS.gov
Posted: 1/4/2011

2010 Changes

Eligibility. For 2010, a qualifying high deductible health plan (HDHP) must have a deductible of at least $1,200 for self-only coverage or $2,400 for family coverage and must limit annual out-of-pocket expenses of the beneficiary to $5,950 for self-only coverage and $11,900 for family coverage.

Employer contributions. Up to specified dollar limits, cash contributions to the HSA of a qualified individual (determined monthly) are exempt from federal income tax withholding, social security tax, Medicare tax, and FUTA tax. For 2010, you can contribute up to the following amounts to a qualified individual's HSA.

  • $3,050 for self-only coverage or $6,150 for family coverage.
  • $4,050 for self-only coverage or $7,150 for family coverage for a qualified individual who is age 55 or older at any time during the year. The $7,150 limit is increased by $1,000 for two married individuals who are age 55 or older at any time during the year provided and each spouse has a separate HSA.

Employers are allowed to make larger HSA contributions for a nonhighly compensated employee than for a highly compensated employee.

For more information, see Health Savings Accounts in the 2010 Publication 15-B Employer's Tax Guide to Fringe Benefits.

2011 Changes

Eligibility. For 2011, a qualifying high deductible health plan (HDHP) must have a deductible of at least $1,200 for self-only coverage or $2,400 for family coverage and must limit annual out-of-pocket expenses of the beneficiary to $5,950 for self-only coverage and $11,900 for family coverage.

Employer contributions. Up to specified dollar limits, cash contributions to the HSA of a qualified individual (determined monthly) are exempt from federal income tax withholding, social security tax, Medicare tax, and FUTA tax. For 2011, you can contribute up to the following amounts to a qualified individual's HSA.

  • $3,050 for self-only coverage or $6,150 for family coverage.
  • $4,050 for self-only coverage or $7,150 for family coverage for a qualified individual who is age 55 or older at any time during the year. The $7,150 limit is increased by $1,000 for two married individuals who are age 55 or older at any time during the year provided and each spouse has a separate HSA.

Employers are allowed to make larger HSA contributions for a nonhighly compensated employee than for a highly compensated employee.

For more information, see Health Savings Accounts in the 2011 Publication 15-B.

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