Could This Be the Jet Craft of the Future?

By Alan Olsen

There’s no question that advances in the travel industry have played a huge role in how the business world operates. As technology has developed and moved, especially in the aircraft industry the ability and ease to conduct global business has been greatly enhanced. While aircraft technology continues to move forward there haven’t been any major advances in the industry for a while. But that doesn’t mean people aren’t trying. SpaceX, for example, is trying to develop several technologies that would enhance travel. The company’s founder, Elon Musk has even announced a Hyperloop competition with the hopes of developing a system that would greatly increase travel times across the country.

Flying in a “Paradoxal” World

Of course, SpaceX is not the only company or individual that is trying to improve travel time around the world. Industrial engineer Charles Bombardier, who has created some incredible concepts before, has been busy working on his latest idea: the Paradoxal. This supersonic machine would carry hundreds of passengers over long distances in very short time periods. Although the idea might seem far-fetched, Bombardier says he believes the idea is more than just a concept and that he could build and operate today with the right development.

Mach 3 Speeds

According to Bombardier, the Paradoxal would have enough power to climb to 60,000 feet and reach Mach 3 speed. So how would the Paradoxal accomplish such a feat? By using air-breathing engines that would turn into rocket engines by injecting liquid oxygen into the gas exhaust port. According to Bombardier this would place the aircraft on a “parabolic suborbital path with an ape of 65 kilometers,” which would put it at a cruising level much higher than the stratosphere.

Issues Still to Be Resolved

The Paradoxal would be constructed of typical aviation materials and it would comply with current airport infrastructure and services. However, the concept is still a work in progress and some of its mechanisms are still not developed. For example, how he would resolve the G-force issue has yet to be determined because according to the NASA aerospace engineer who has worked with Bombardier on the Paradoxal, “The most efficient suborbital G-flight path is probably not comfortable for most civilian passengers.”

An Amazing View

So just how fast would this aircraft be able to go? According to its designer the Paradoxal would be capable of flying from Los Angeles, CA to Sydney Australia in less than four hours. However, this aircraft would not be ideal for shorter trips because the takeoff and landing phases would likely take about two hours combined for any destination, so the aircraft would be most appropriate for much longer trips. Another plus to this concept is that passengers would actually be able to see the curvature of the earth while in flight and for a brief moment they would even be able to get a taste of weightlessness. Of course this is just a concept so it remains to be seen if it will ever be pursued. So for now, it’s still just something that dreams are made of.